How To Get The Best Out Of Your Charter Fishing

charter fishingHow To Get The Best Out Of Your Charter Fishing

Charter fishing services offer many benefits, especially when you’re on vacation. Charter boats are often considered expensive, but this is not always true. Below are some benefits to help you understand fishing charters.

The benefits of charter fishing

Myrtle Beach Fishing is a passion that many people have. Anglers who are unfamiliar with this area will rely on word-of-mouth recommendations for hotspots or locations. You won’t find many spots if your boat is not available, whether it’s a rental boat or one you own.

These issues can be eliminated by charter fishing services. You don’t need to bring or rent anything. You can relax and fish as a passenger. It’s easy to just show up at the dock and hop in the boat. This is a great way to enhance your fishing experience and focus on the fishing.

A charter fishing service in your local area provides another benefit: they know the area well. A local captain will know the best spots to fish for fish and you’ll be sure to catch one. This will greatly increase the number of fish that you catch.

A smaller charter fishing boat can allow you to access remote locations that are otherwise impossible with a larger vessel. The hot spots can make a big difference in catching fish or not.

Read More How To Get The Best Out Of Your Charter Fishing

9 Tips To Be A Better Client When You Go Charter Fishing

charter fishingNo matter where you are going, there is a certain manner of doing things when you go charter fishing. Anglers who aren’t aware of these rules can make a trip miserable. These tips can help you to be a better customer and make your fishing trip more enjoyable for you and your crew.

Tips To Remember When You Go Charter Fishing

1. It takes a first impression to make a lasting impression

Ask your captain to allow you to board the boat before you start your day. You could bet that the boat is close to their hearts. It’s their office, their livelihood and where they spend most their waking hours.

Even if they wait for you and greet you warmly, asking permission to come aboard can be a great way for you to immediately get to know the captain and show your respect.

2. There are no bananas on the boat

Seriously. This one may be familiar to you. A vast majority of fishing captains believe that you should not bring bananas to the boat, whether you are an expert or novice angler.

Captains may take this superstition one step further and refuse to allow anything with the word “banana” on their boat, such as Banana Republic clothing or Banana Boat sunscreen lotion. There are many theories about where this belief originated, but you can bet that anything, ranging from mechanical problems up to bad weather or even tight-lipped fished, would be blamed if you bring a banana to your charter boat.

Read More 9 Tips To Be A Better Client When You Go Charter Fishing

What You Need To Know About Charter Fishing In Intracoastal Waterway

charter fishingThe coast of South Carolina includes a section of the Atlantic Intracoastal waterway. This is a network of man-made canals that connects inlets, bays and rivers. For anglers from South Carolina, the Intracoastal Waterway offers a variety of freshwater and salt fishing opportunities. The Intracoastal Waterway is a great place to go if you’re looking for a memorable charter fishing trip on the Carolina coast.

Charter Fishing: Where to go?

The South Carolina section of the Intracoastal waterway runs along the South Carolina coast. It covers famous places like Myrtle Beach, Charleston, and Hilton Head. You’ll find a lot of places where you can go charter fishing

What to Catch?

Freshwater fishing can bring you shad, herring and white crappie as well as catfish, redfish, and striped bass. Saltwater fishing will bring you flounder, red drum fish, sea bass, cobia and mackerel. You should also be aware that the seasons and catch restrictions can vary, so make sure to check our weekly fishing report.

Read More What You Need To Know About Charter Fishing In Intracoastal Waterway

May 20 Myrtle Beach Fishing Report

May 20
Morning surface water temperatures are in the mid-70s inshore around Little River.
With calmer conditions there have been better fishing conditions this week, and Captain Patrick “Smiley” Kelly (843-361-7445) reports that they have had some exciting inshore opportunities this week. In the Intracoastal Waterway 40-plus inch red drum have showed up, and they are catching them on a Carolina rig with cut ladyfish or mullet. There are also plenty of Atlantic sharpnose sharks around which are giving good action
Redfish can also still be caught in shallow potholes back in the creeks on the low to rising tide. Live mullet, pinfish and Gulp! can all work.
Around shallow sandbars in less than three feet there have also been a mix of ladyfish, trout and bluefish caught on light tackle this week. The key has been having moving water with a good current, and casting silver spoons with a fast retrieve has been the best technique. Trout can also be caught at the jetty rocks on live shrimp which are becoming more widely available.
There are also still some black drum being caught on live or fresh cut shrimp on ledges, and they will also take fiddler crabs fished around structure. There are plenty of sheepshead that have returned inshore around the rocks but some days it’s hard to weed through the little ones. Still, there are keepers.
The flounder fishing is getting better as fish start to spread out more, and they are catching fish in deeper holes and sandy bottoms. The fish are starting to filter out into all the creeks and inlets, and they can also be caught around docks and oyster beds. In addition to live bait, Gulp! new penny, white or chartreuse shrimp are all working.
The storm two nights ago temporarily dirtied the water off the Cherry Grove Pier (843-249-1625), but before (and likely after) that it has been a really good week off the pier. They have had two kings and plenty of people have been limiting on 12-18 inch Spanish mackerel to go along with lots of mid-sized bluefish. They have had a few flounder over 16 inches to go along with lots of short fish, while decent numbers of pompano, whiting and croaker are being caught.
Water temperatures are 75 degrees in the surf.
At the nearshore reefs there are plenty of Spanish mackerel and bluefish around which can be caught casting or trolling spoons. There are also tons of small black sea bass.

May 12 Myrtle Beach Fishing Report

May 12
Morning surface water temperatures are around 69 degrees inshore around Little River.
The conditions have been tough for fishing this week, as Captain Patrick “Smiley” Kelly (843-361-7445) reports that 25-30 mile per hour winds have been super challenging. They are still catching some fish but they are really, really having to work for them.
There are still some redfish in shallow potholes back in the creeks on the low to rising tide. Live mullet, pinfish and Gulp! can all work. For trout the key is still having live shrimp, available at Perry’s in Murrells Inlet or Dave’s Outpost in Sunset Beach, North Carolina. They are biting along the ledges in the IntraCoastal Waterway or around the rocks at the jetties. There are also redfish at the rocks.
There are also still some black drum being caught on live or fresh cut shrimp on the same ledges where the trout are located, and they will also take fiddler crabs fished around structure. There are plenty of sheepshead that have returned inshore around the rocks but some days it’s hard to weed through the little ones. Still, there are plenty of keepers.
There are some flounder being caught in the Little River area, but by far the best action continues to be in Cherry Grove. Cherry Grove has a smaller inlet which confines the
fish and gives them less room to roam, and so they are much denser. Drifting live mullet or mud minnows is working but Vudu Shrimp are also effective.
Unsurprisingly the action has also really slowed on the Cherry Grove Pier (843-249-1625), and while they were catching really good numbers of Spanish mackerel before they are only getting a very few since the water conditions got bad. They are also getting the very occasional whiting and croaker, but overall the fishing is just poor.
If someone could get out there, at the nearshore reefs Spanish mackerel and blues should both be plentiful. They can be caught casting small spoons and Gotcha plugs.

Myrtle Beach Fishing Report May 4

May 4
Morning surface water temperatures are around 71 degrees inshore around Little River.
The fishing has been strong recently at the top end of South Carolina’s coast, and Captain Patrick “Smiley” Kelly (843-361-7445) reports that inshore they catching lot of redfish in shallow potholes back in the creeks on the low to rising tide. Live mullet, pinfish and Gulp! are all working.
The trout fishing is also pretty good but the key is still having live shrimp, available at Perry’s in Murrells Inlet or Dave’s Outpost in Sunset Beach, North Carolina. They are biting along the ledges in the IntraCoastal Waterway or around the rocks at the jetties. They are also picking up some redfish at the rocks.
There are also some black drum being caught on live or fresh cut shrimp on the same ledges where the trout are located, and they will also take fiddler crabs fished around structure. There are plenty of sheepshead that have returned inshore around the rocks but some days it’s hard to weed through the little ones. Still, there are plenty of keepers.
There are some flounder being caught in the Little River area, but by far the best action continues to be in Cherry Grove. Cherry Grove has a smaller inlet which confines the
fish and gives them less room to roam, and so they are much denser. Drifting live mullet or mud minnows is working but Vudu Shrimp are also effective.
There’s been some exciting fishing at the Cherry Grove Pier (843-249-1625), and last week they had the first king mackerel of the year while this week has been an excellent week for Spanish mackerel and bluefish. They are getting tons of 16-19 inch Spanish, while bluefish are a range of sizes up to 3 or 4 pounds. Today the water has gotten muddy and so they are only catching whiting and croaker, but when it clears the Spanish should turn back on. They are also getting some keeper flounder.
Speaking of Spanish and blues, at the nearshore reefs both species are plentiful. They are being caught casting small spoons and Gotcha plugs, and when the weather is calm enough to get offshore the action is hot.

X
Book Now